Novel just published

Call to Valor

A novel by

Gary Beck

For Immediate Release

Call to Valor is a sweeping story of war, love and courage, as determined Americans face the war on terror, in a world of increasing nuclear threats. A dedicated doctor and a resourceful Marine join forces to prevent a terrorist group from detonating a dirty nuclear bomb in New York City.

CallToValorCoverPressRelease

Call to Valor is a 354 page novel. Available in paperback with a retail price of $19.99, and eBook with a retail price of $. ISBN:1365244989 Published through Gnome on Pig Productions and available now through all major retailers. For more information or to request a review copy, contact:alexisallinson@gnomeonpigproductions

https://www.amazon.com/Call-Valor-Gary-Beck/dp/1365244989/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1470673910&sr=1-1&keywords=9781365244988

Gary Beck has spent most of his adult life as a theater director, and as an art dealer when he couldn’t make a living in theater. He has 11 published chapbooks and 3 more accepted for publication. His poetry collections include:Days of Destruction (Skive Press), Expectations (Rogue Scholars Press). Dawn in Cities, Assault on Nature, Songs of a Clerk, Civilized Ways, Displays, Perceptions (Winter Goose Publishing). Fault Lines, Tremors, Perturbations, Rude Awakenings and The Remission of Order will be published by Winter Goose Publishing. Conditioned Response (Nazar Look). Resonance (Dreaming Big Publications). His novels include: Extreme Change (Cogwheel Press) andFlawed Connections (Black Rose Writing). Call to Valor (Gnome on Pig Productions) and Acts of Defiance will be published by Dreaming Big Publications. His short story collection, A Glimpse of Youth (Sweatshoppe Publications). Now I Accuse and other stories will be published by Winter Goose Publishing. His original plays and translations of Moliere, Aristophanes and Sophocles have been produced Off Broadway. His poetry, fiction and essays have appeared in hundreds of literary magazines. He currently lives in New York City.

Gnome On Pig Productions works with  authors, artisans and illustrators to achieve the common goal of success and have expanded into an international publisher. gnomeonpigproductions.com

New Poetry Book

Resonance

A Poetry Collection by

Gary Beck

For Immediate Release

Resonance is a collection of poems that looks at individual and cultural experiences from this complicated world in which some receive rewards but others are punished and pushed to the brink of despair.

“Very impressive poems” -Dead Snakes Magazine

“The noir voice and objectivity of each piece is unique and exploratory, very delightful reads” -Media Virus Magazine

“Awesome! I love the language” -Graffiti Magazine

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http://www.amazon.com/Resonance-Poetry-Collection-Gary-Beck/dp/1523916400/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1456246095&sr=8-1&keywords=resonance+poetry

Resonance is a 136 page poetry volume. Available in paperback with a retail price of $8.00 and eBook with a retail price of $1.99. ISBN 1523916400 Published through Dreaming Big Publications. and available now through all major retailers.For more information or to request a review copy, contact Dreaming Big Publications at: DreamingBigPublications@outlook.com

Gary Beck has spent most of his adult life as a theater director, and as an art dealer when he couldn’t make a living in theater. He has 11 published chapbooks. His poetry collections include: Days of Destruction (Skive Press), Expectations (Rogue Scholars Press). Dawn in Cities, Assault on Nature, Songs of a Clerk, Civilized Ways, Displays (Winter Goose Publishing). Fault Lines, Perceptions, Tremors and Perturbations will be published by Winter Goose Publishing. Conditioned Response (Nazar Look). Resonance (Dreaming Big Press). His novels include: Extreme Change (Cogwheel Press) Acts of Defiance (Artema Press). Flawed Connections (Black Rose Writing). Call to Valor will be published by Gnome on Pigs Productions. His short story collection, A Glimpse of Youth (Sweatshoppe Publications). Now I Accuse and other stories will be published by Winter Goose Publishing. His original plays and translations of Moliere, Aristophanes and Sophocles have been produced Off Broadway. His poetry, fiction and essays have appeared in hundreds of literary magazines. He currently lives in New York City.

Dreaming Big Publications is a publishing company on a mission to reach more people on a global level by publishing books that educate and advocate for mental health and social justice issues. For more information go to dreamingbigpublications.com.

Review of my recently published poetry collection, “Displays”

Displays by Gary Beck

(reviewed by Paul Dolinsky)

The book begins with poems that are stark and unrelenting, written as proems rather than in a more lyrical style. The first poem is on 9/11, followed by others that deal with issue of class inequality, the Iraq War, issues of suffering and the meaning of life. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, for the first of several poems about birds also appear.

The order and intensity of the poems early in the book, is certainly no accident’s on the poet’s part. He might have presented the poems in a more chronological fashion, which would made the second part of the book, into the first part. The poems in the second part of the book, are for the most part, I believe, written earlier in the poet’s life. They are stylistically, lyrical, more upbeat in tone, and sometimes employ rhyme. At least two of those reference the poet in his 20’s, and his travels in Europe, which appears to have occurred around that time.

However, the poet wants to hit us sharply, in the first part of this book. The severe style of many of the poems seems to be a function both of the material itself, and possibly, the poet’s own aging and hardening of attitude (of which he writes, literally, in “ The Peril of Age “, early in the book). However, it would be a mistake to view the poet as a pessimistic prophet of doom, or as expressing fatalistic resignation to suffering. Rather, Gary Beck, poet, is more the patient teacher, trying to teach through his poems, as didactic tools. The condensed clarity of phrasing of many of the poems, suits them well as teaching tools.

His work harkens back thematically, if not explicitly, to his earlier work as a director of classical Greek drama. Greek drama too, depicts much war and suffering. At the very beginning of Western drama, the Iliad tells the story of such a war, with all its attendant suffering. In classical Greece, suffering exists in the context of fate (governed by the Three Fates, who are spinners), justice (dike) and the tragic flaw of pride (hubris).

The poems, as a grouping, present several different approaches to the issue of suffering — that of humans, animals, and in the natural world. The concept of fate or chance, as the family and class into which one is born, has a significant place in this collection of poems, fate being one cause of suffering. However, even if one can’t control the accident of birth, one can control their folly, in terms of whether they learn lessons of human history and their own history. Thus, not learning the lessons of history, and one’s personal history, is the second cause of suffering, which the poet describes. Suffering is also due to lack of empathy with fellow creatures, which is the third cause of suffering. This lack of empathy applies to both human and non-humans, and figures prominently in several poems.

Often written in the first person voice, these poems express compassion for the suffering of the poor, of animals, especially if due to humans, as in bullfighting. Empathy can transcend politics. And so, there is a poem, written in the first person voice of Muslim, seeking advice from their Imam over whom to support in the aftermath of the Iraq war, reflecting human concerns in general.

To restate, the poems express the views that suffering is due to accident of birth as an expression of cosmic chance, lack of empathy with others, and not learning the lessons of one’s history and history of one’s group. It is also important that a species understand its own nature, or essence, which the poet feels that humans do not. Greek philosophy, going back to Aristotle, is likewise, very essentialist, describing things in terms of their essences (horme) which makes each thing what it is. The poet presents his view on the human essence in a very striking way, in a poem on doves and hawks, which occurs early in the book, and is one of my favorite.

Confused Peace

Unlike hawks,

doves are flock birds,

on close observation

quite violent.

The predatory hawk

operates alone,

except for a mate

is a solitary bird

with no flock urges,

only kills for food,

rarely attacks others,

lacks basic social skills,

content in nature

as long as man permits

the existence of nature.

Yet we’ve made the dove

a symbol of peace,

the hawk represents war,

confused labels

that lead us astray

from urgent questions

of war and peace.

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The book has several poems about war. Let me include one of these poems here, which I think is a stark and powerful anti-war poem, effective in its lyricism and didactic quality, in its positive sense, as I’ve described:

Friend or Foe

We no longer think of your U-Boats

surfacing in frigid seas,

welcoming our offspring with torpedoes.

We’ve already forgotten your aircraft

swooping down from the rising sun,

kissing our sons with tracers.

We barely remember your endless,

quilted hordes

marching from Asian depths,

greeting our children with U.S. steel.

In each bitter war

our patriotic armies met the enemy,

sweltered, bled, blistered, froze,

obeyed their orders,

and joined the hallowed dead.

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Though he writes that some wars seem to have been necessary, he decries the fact that countries needlessly pit themselves against others in in war, when co-operation to solve problems would be the wiser action. It may appear that the poet adopts a right of center attitude regarding such issues as American patriotism and wanting to curb illegal immigration into the country. But the poet is not so much ideologue of left or right, but as stated, a patient teacher, who delineates actions and reactions to events of history.

Displays is a worthwhile read, and I hope it encourages readers to explore more of Gary Beck’s poetry from his many other works.

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